Dress Regulations Officers Royal Canadian Corps of Signals 1936-39

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Serial No.              


DRESS REGULATIONS

OFFICERS

THE ROYAL CANADIAN CORPS OF SIGNALS.


2nd Edition – September, 1936


//signed//

E. Forde

Colonel,

Officer Administering,

The R.C.Signals.


Corps Headquarters,

Ottawa,

1st Sept. 1936.


DRESS REGULATIONS

Officers The R.C.Signals


Record of Amendments

No.
Dated
Date
entered
Initials
1
20-10-36 C.P.T.
2
26-11-36 C.P.T.
3
18-8-37 27-9-37 C.P.T.
4
17-9-38 22-9-38 Unknown initials
5
21-1-39 25-1-39 Unknown initials
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24


TABLE OF CONTENTS.

Paragraphs.
PART I General Instructions 1 – 22
PART II Orders of Dress 23
PART III Staff and dress distinctions 24 – 27
PART IV Orders, decorations and medals. 28 – 34
PART V Substantive colonels, officers of the reserve and retired list. 35 – 36
PART VI Full Dress 37 – 52
PART VII Undress 53 – 58
PART VIII Mess Dress 59 – 67
PART IX Service Dress 68 – 85
PART X Summer Dress 86 – 97
PART XI Furs 98 - 99
PART XII Miscellaneous (Corps Crest and colours) 100 - 102
APPENDIX I Diagrams At back.
INDEX …….. At back.


PART I.- GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS.

1. Commanding Officers are forbidden to introduce or sanction any deviation from the authorized patterns of dress, clothing, equipment and badges. They will be responsible for the cost of replacing or restoring to the authorized pattern any articles worn in their units which may be found not found to be in uniformity with the authorized patterns.

2. When obtaining uniform and equipment, officers should make sure, by personal inspection or reference to their Commanding Officers, that articles in accordance with authorized patterns are being supplied. Sealed patterns of cloth for various garments are maintained at Corps Headquarters and at the Canadian Signal Training Centre.

3. No unauthorized ornament or emblem is to be worn when in uniform. Watch chains and trinkets are not to be worn in such a manner as to be seen.

4. All ranks, when on duty, are permitted to wear national flowers or emblems on their uniform headdress on the days specified hereunder:-

Occasion.
        
Emblem.
        
By whom worn.
Dominion Day Maple Leaf All.
St. George’s Day Rose Personnel of English descent.
St. Andrew’s Day Thistle Personnel of Scottish descent.
St. Patrick’s Day Shamrock Personnel of Irish descent.
St. David’s Day Leek Personnel of Welsh descent.
St. Jean Baptiste Day Maple Leaf Personnel of French-Canadian descent.
Remembrance Day
(Nov. 11th)
Poppy All.

5. Regulation uniform must not be worn at fancy dress balls, but there is no objection to military uniform of obsolete pattern being worn on such occasions.

6. Uniform will be worn while on duty, unless otherwise ordered by the District Officer Commanding. In the Permanent Active Militia it is left to the discretion of the senior Permanent Active Militia Officers in the garrison to permit plain clothes to be worn when not on duty.

7. Officers while in a foreign country are not to wear uniform without having obtained the permission of His Majesty’s representative or of the Canadian Minister in countries to which one is appointed. Such permission is granted only when an officer is employed on duty or attending Court, at State ceremonies to which he has been invited, at ceremonials or entertainments to which he has been invited, or on occasions when the wearing of uniform would appear appropriate. Applications, giving rank, unit, medals and decorations, should be addressed to the British Ambassador, the nearest British Consular Officer, or the Canadian Minister for the country concerned.

No officer of the Canadian Militia is at liberty to attend in uniform the manoeuvres or public parades of a foreign army without the permission of the Minister.

Individual officers of the Canadian Militia will not proceed in uniform on a visit to a foreign country without first obtaining, through the usual channel, the permission of National Defence Headquarters. Instructions regarding special arrangements in respect of officers entering the United States of America in uniform, or wearing uniform while in that country will be published from time to time as required.

8. METAL FOR ORNAMENTS, BADGES, DEVICES, FURNITURE, ETC..

The yellow metal for officers’ badges, ornaments, devices and furniture generally may be either of gilding metal or gilding metal water gilt. Gilding metal is cheaper, and is recommended as always presenting the same appearance, as water gilt wears in cleaning. The terms “gilt” or “silver” imply metal, unless embroidery is stated.

9. BADGES.

(a) Badges of Rank.
The rank of officers is shown by badges under:-
Colonel -Crown and two stars below.
Lieutenant Colonel -Crown and one star below.
Major -Crown.
Captain -Three stars.
Lieutenant -Two stars.
Second-Lieutenant -One star.
Badges of rank, except when otherwise ordered, will be worn on all shoulder cords and shoulder straps. They will be in silver embroidery of gold shoulder cords and gold-laced shoulder straps, and gilt or gilding metal on plain sloth shoulder straps.
The crowns when laid on shoulder cords or shoulder straps are 1-ich broad and 1-inch in height; the stars are 1-inch between opposite points.
Officers having brevet, local, temporary or honorary rank may wear the badges of that rank.
(b) Cap Badges.
(i) For Forage Cap.
In gilt with the figure of Mercury in silver; An oval inscribed “Royal Canadian Corps of Signals” and surmounted by a crown, with the figure of Mercury inset, standing on a globe. Parly encircling the oval two sprays of Maple leaves with stems crossed at the bottom, and fastened by a ribbon, the whole resting on a scroll inscribed:-
“VELOX -- VERSUTUS-VIGILANS”.
(ii) For Cap Service Dress and Caps winter “Yukon” Pattern.
In bronze similar in design as described in para. 9 (b) (i).
(iii) Position of Badge. (See Appendix 1)
For the forge cap and cap service dress the badge will be fixed in the centre of the band of the cap immediately above the peak; for the cap, winter “Yukon” pattern the badge will be fixed in the centre of the front.
(c) COLLAR BADGES
(i) For Full Dress Tunic, Frock Serge, and Mess Kit Jacket.
In gilt, with flags enamelled (one blue and one white with blue stripe): A scroll bearing the motto "“Velox – Versutus – Vigilans" surmounted with a beaver over the centre, with a spray of maple leaves on either side; crossed signalling flags supporting the monogram "R.C.C.S." the whole surmounted by a crown.
(ii) For Service Dress Jacket.
In bronze similar in design as described in para. 9 (c) (i).
(iii) Position of Badge (See Appendix 1).
Full Dress:
The badges will be fixed with their centre two inches from the neck opening and equidistant from the top and bottom of the black cloth of the collar.
Frock Serge:
The badges will be fixed with their centre 2 inches from the neck opening and equidistant from the top and bottom of the collar.
Note:
With the open neck serge frock the badges will be fixed as for the service dress jacket.
Mess Dress:
If medals are worn the badges will be fixed on the lapel of the jacket ¾ inch below the bottom of the medals. If no medals are worn the badges will be fixed on the lapel of the jacket 5 inches below the shoulder seam.
Service Dress Jacket:
The badges will be fixed[1] 1-1/4 inches above the step of the jacket (see Appendix I).
Khaki Drill Jacket:
Collar badges are not worn on the khaki drill jacket.
Note:
In all cases, collar badges are worn with the head of the beaver pointing inwards..
(d) SHOULDER TITLES.
Will be worn only on khaki drill jackets. The title will be fixed evenly on the shoulder strap, one-half inch from the shoulder seam. Shoulder titles will be of the same pattern and material as those authorized for other ranks.

10. BUTTONS.

Buttons on tunics, jackets, etc., will be at equal distances. All buttons except for Mess Dress and those worn on gorget patches will be die struck. The buttons worn on aricles of service dress will be of gilding metal ungilt, with the exception of the Cap, service, where the buttons will be bronze. For blazers either flat engraved or flat die struck Corps buttons are worn.

Description:

(a) Large:

A plain die struck button with the figure of Mercury and a portion of the globe superimposed thereon. (40 Ligne)

(b) Small:

Of similar design to the large button. (26 Ligne)

(c) Mess Kit:

As for (b) with the figure of Mercury in silver. (26 Ligne)

(d) Cap:

Of similar design to the large button. (20 Ligne)

(e) Blazer:

See para. 11.

11. BLAZER (optional garment).

Single or double breasted with three large patch pockets single-breasted type will have three large buttons in front; double-breasted four, (two on each side). Both types will have two small buttons on each cuff. The buttons may be either flat engraved with the Corps Crest, or flat die struck Corps button. The Corps Crest on the breast patch pocket, either in gold or silver embroidery or the same colours in silk. Dimensions of Crest on pocket to be, approximately 3-1/4 inches in height – and 3 inches wide at the base. (Cloth – Hawkes & Co. Pattern No.333).

12. BELTS “SAM BROWNE”.

The universal pattern “Sam Browne” in brown leather, with two braces, revolver case, ammunition . . . [remainder of text is obscured by a pasted in amendment]

13. CANES.

When walking out in uniform or parading without swords all officers of the Corps will carry brown leather-covered riding canes, 24 inches long, and ¾ inch in diameter.

14. SPURS. Made of stainless steel. The maximum length of . . . [remainder of text is obscured by a pasted in amendment][2]

15.

[beginning of paragraph text is obscured by a pasted in amendment. Topic is believed to be "Mourning Dress"]

. . . Governor of a Province, or on duty with an escort, guard of honour, or saluting battery for His Excellency the Governor-General, or a Lieutenant-Governor of a Province. Officers will not attend military dances in uniform during the period of Court Mourning.
(b) Court Half-Mourning.
Except as laid down in the first sentence of sub-para. (a) above, Court half-mounting is not applicable to officers of the Canadian Militia.
(c) Service Mourning.
In the event of “Service Mourning” for the Canadian Militia being ordered, it will only affect officers; special instructions regarding its application and duration will be issued.
(d) Military Funerals.
When attending military funerals or ceremonial services connected therewith, officers will wear a mourning band. A mourning band will not be worn at ceremonies such as the unveiling of memorials and Remembrance Day celebrations[3].
(e) Private Mourning.
Officers in private mourning, when in uniform may wear a mourning band as described in sub-para. (f). Mourning bands will not be worn by officers[4] at levees or at Court except as provided at sub-para. (a).
(f) Mourning Band.
The mourning band will be of black crepe or black broadcloth 3-1/4 inches wide, and will be worn around the left arm half-way between the elbow and shoulder; it will be worn on all orders of dress and on greatcoats.

16. ARMLETS

Signal Officers, when engaged in special duties will wear blue and white armlet. Armlets will be worn [5] on the right arm above the elbow in service dress and one the greatcoat when that garment is worn. (see also para. 27)

17. SWORDS AND SCABBARDS.

(a) Infantry pattern with brown leather scabbard and sword knot.
(b) Swords will not be carried on active service nor in “Marching Order”. Subject to this proviso, swords will be carried on parades and duties unless otherwise directed. They will not be worn at mess or stables or on board ships, except by officers paying official visits to Naval ships.
(c) Carriage of Sword in Full Dress.
(i)The scabbards of officers of dismounted units are hooked up in case where the waist belt is worn over the tunic. They are carried in the left hand by other officers, including mounted officers when on dismounted duties.
(ii) When the sword is carried in the left hand (i.e. not hooked up), the following details will be observed:-
Standing at Attention.
The sword in the scabbard is held upright by the side, the shoe of the scabbard resting on the ground to the left of the left foot and just in front of the heel of the boot. The left arm is extended, the hand around the scabbard, thumb in front, fingers in rear, back of the hand outwards.
When Walking.
The sword is raised and the scabbard grasped at the point of balance and held at an angle of 45 degrees with the ground, fingers around the scabbard, thumb along the edge, arm fully extended.

18. SWORD KNOTS.

The sword knot to be used with the “Sam Browne” belt is the universal pattern of brown leather. It is a plain strap make of pig skin, best bridle leather or calf, the ends being secured in an “Acorn” having plaited leather covering. It is furnished with a sliding keeper. Length of strap in the double 15 inches, width of strap 5/8 inch; length of acorn 2½ inches. Sword knots are worn loose in all orders of dress.

19. COAT BRITISH WARM (Optional garment).

Drab cloth of approved shade for service dress, cut double breasted and to reach to the knee, a slit at centre of back, turn down collar two inches deep with lapel and step; three large leather buttons on each side to show and a bone button under turn; two small leather buttons on cuffs with 3½ inch slit, two bottom pockets with flap, one inside breast; a sword slit on the left side seam; shoulder straps of the same material as garment fastened with a small bone button under collar. Badges of rank in gilt metal; the edges are single stiched; a tab under collar to button across when required.[6]

This coat is the approved pattern for wear in service dress by general officers, brigadiers and officers of Foot Guards. For all other officers, it is an optional garment for wear when not parading with troops.

20. CAPES (Optional garment)

Capes (Optional garment) dark navy blue . . . [remainder of text is not known]

21. WATERPROOF COAT (Optional Garment).

Waterproof drab cotton twill, single breasted, fastened with bone buttons and reaching to the knees; two cross pockets with flaps below the waist, a slit in the skirt. Waist belt with buckle and two belt loops.

The Waterproof Coat is an optional garment and is not worn in any order of dress.

Officers are recommended to obtain the “Hawkes Waterproof”.

22. WHISTLES AND LANYARDS.

Whistles will be infantry[7] pattern as issued to other ranks. Whistles will be attached to a lanyard of the colour of the service dress, when worn with service dress, or of the colour of khaki drill when worn with khaki drill. The lanyard will be worn around the left[8] shoulder and the whistle carried in the left[9] breast pocket of the jacket. Unless otherwise ordered, whistles will be worn when in marching and drill order and on duty with troops.


PART II.

ORDERS OF DRESS.

23. The orders of dress for officers on different occasions are given below. These orders are to be observed and read in conjunction with the dress and equipment regulations.

Number and Type of Dress. Articles. Occasions when worn. Remarks.
1. Full-Dress Mounted. Full dress headdress.
Tunic.
Pantaloons.[10]
Butcher boots.[11]
Spurs.
White leather gloves (black in Rifle Regiments).
(1) State ceremonies *.
(2) Royal escorts.
(3) Guards on Royal Residences.
(4) Guards of Honour.
(5) Guards on garrison duties as may be ordered by D.Os.C.
(6) As may be specially ordered.
* It will be considered a State occasion when the Sovereign or the representative of the Sovereign is present; the parade in celebration of the birthday of the Sovereign; or when specially ordered on the occasion of any parade or ceremony at which a member of the Royal Family is present.
2. Full Dress Dismounted Full dress headdress.
Tunic.
Overalls.
Wellington Boots.
White leather gloves (black in Rifle Regiments).
Orders, Decorations and Medals.
For dismounted officers.
As in No.1 Dress.
For all officers at-
(1) General Courts-martial.
(2) Church parades.
(3) Ceremonies and entertainments when it is considered desirable to do special honour to the occasion.
(4) Weddings if desired.
(5) Funerals.
(6) As may be specially ordered.
(a) Kilts and accessories and shoes in kilted regiments.
(b) Officers of the Foot Guards, other than C.Os., officers second-in-command and adjutants will wear trousers instead of overalls. On certain occasions officers permanently in command of companies will wear overalls.
3. Full Dress Levees and Courts. All officers As for No.2 Dress with White kid gloves in lieu of leather (black in Rifle Regiments). Levees and Courts. Officers of Highland Regiments will wear the special articles of Levee Dress as laid down in Dress Regulations.
4. Service Dress Marching Order. Drab Service Dress as laid down in the Dress Regulations with steel helmet or S.D. Cap as ordered. (a)
Small ribands of orders, decorations and medals to be worn on the breast. The width of ribands of orders to be the size of the ribands of the companionship or membership of orders. All ribands to be 3/8 inch in length.
Haversack.
Waterbottle.
Field-glasses. (b)Field Message Book (A.B.153).
Revolver (b).
Ammunition pouch (b).
Compass (b).
Greatcoat, waterproof coat, or waterproof sheet.
Brown leather gloves (black in Rifle Regiments).
Anti-gas respirator.
(1) Active Service.
(2) Training.
(3) Manoeuvres.
(4) Marches.
(5) As may be specially ordered.
(a) The soft S.D. Cap is carried or worn by all services on Active Service, except that in Highland and Scottish Regiments the Tam O’Shanter or other pattern as authorized for the other ranks of any particular regiment is worn.
"The khaki S.D. Cap will be worn by general officers, brigadiers and substantive colonels."
The articles to be carried on active service are detailed in the Field Service Manuals. The steel helmet will be carried on the shoulder when not worn.
(b) Revolver, field-glasses and compasses will be carried only by officers of those units who are provided with these articles under Equipment Regulations.
Ammunition pouch will only be worn when the revolver is carried.
5. Service Dress-Drill Order Drab Service Dress as laid down in the Dress Regulations. (a)
Small ribands of orders, decorations and medals to be worn on the breast. The width of ribands of orders to be the size of the ribands of the companionship or membership of orders. All ribands to be 3/8 inch in length.
When ordered-
Field-glasses.
Haversack.
Waterbottle.
Greatcoat, waterproof coat, or waterproof sheet.
(1) Divisional and brigade parades as may be ordered.
(2) All ordinary drills, riding schools, regimental duties and examination for promotion.
(3) District Courts-martial.
(4) Courts of Inquiry and boards.
(5) As may be specially ordered.
(a) Forge Cap (with drab cover) will be worn by General Officers, Brigadiers and substantive colonels. Other officers wear the stiff pattern S.D. Cap except Foot Guards who wear the forage cap.
Highland and Scottish Regiments - Tam O’Shanter unless another pattern of cap is authorized for the other ranks of any particular regiment.
6. Mess Order. Mess dress as detailed in the Dress Regulations, with miniature orders, decorations, and medals.
Stars, ribands and badges of orders (except the ribands and badges of the Order of Merit and of Companion of Honour) are not worn.
Dining at naval, military or Air Force messes and with G.O.C., D.O.C. or Flag Officer of the Navy of the Senior Naval or Air Force Officer at a station, unless full dress is ordered.
Naval, military or Air Force evening dances and entertainments.
Dining on board ship, and Government transports.
Mess dress will not be worn at manoeuvres or in camp. The undress serge frock with overalls and Wellington boots or trousers, black socks and black oxford shoes may be worn in camp or as summer dress in barracks.
7. Undress Frock coat.
Overalls.
Wellington boots.
Cocked hat.
White gloves.
Sash.
As may be specially ordered. (1) This order of dress is applicable to General Officers, Brigadiers, A.D.Cs. officers of Foot Guards and directors of music. Regimental officers will wear the forage cap instead of the cocked hat.
(2) Swords will be worn.
(3) Small ribands of orders, decorations and medals will be worn on the breast. Broad ribands, badges of orders, and neck decorations (other than O.M. and C.H.) will not be worn. One star only of an order will be worn (if in possession of more than one, that of the senior order should normally be worn). A star of a foreign order may be worn in addition on appropriate occasions.
(4) When mounted pantaloons and butcher boots will replace overalls and Wellington boots.[12]
8. Undress. As for No.7 Undress with the exception that the forge cap will replace the cocked hat. As may be specially ordered. (1) As above (No.7 Undress) with the exceptions:-

(a) A star of an order will not be worn.
(b) The O.M. and C.H. will not be worn.
(c) Swords will be worn unless otherwise ordered.

9. Undress.. Serge frock
When mounted - Pantaloons and butcher boots.
When dismounted – Overalls and Wellington boots.[13]
Forage Cap.
Brown gloves (black in Rifle Regiments).
Small ribands of orders, decorations and medals to be worn on the breast. The width of ribands of orders to be the size of the ribands of the companionship or membership of orders. All ribands to be 3/8 inch in length.
As may be specially ordered. See para.11, sub-para (iv) regarding the wearing of belts.[14] Swords will not be worn unless specially ordered. In Highland and Scottish Regiments the Glengarry Cap in place of the forage cap. Other authorized articles of dress peculiar to Highland and Scottish Regiments may be worn according to regimental custom. In Rifle Regiments, the black patent-leather shoulder belt, with pouch, is worn instead of the “Sam Browne” belt, except when thst when the sword is carried the web waist belt with black leather slings is worn.

NOTE: When the serge frock is worn in the place of the Mess jacket or when not on duty, the “Sam Browne” belt will not be worn.


PART III.

STAFF AND DRESS DISTINCTIONS.

24. AIGUILLETTE.

The aiguillette is the distinguishing mark of certain officers serving on the Staff of the Militia and of officers holding certain personal appointments.

It is worn on all occasions with the tunic and frock coat, but not with mess dress, service dress or the serge frock.[15]

It is worn on the right shoulder by the Inspector-General, by Military Members of the National Defence Council and personal staffs of the Governor-General and Lieutenant-Governors. In all other cases, it is worn on the left shoulder.

The aiguillette worn by an Hon. A.D.C. or an A.D.C. to the Governor-General, by an A.D.C. to a Lieutenant-Governor, and by an Honorary Physician or an Honorary Surgeon to the Governor-General is a gold aiguillette, ¼ inch wire cord, gilt metal tags at end of plaits, the plaits and cords, front and back, are joined together by a short gold braid strap, in which is worked a button hole by which it is attached to a button under the outer end of the shoulder cord.

The aiguillette worn by staff officers is cord, ¼ inch gold and red orris basket, with plait and loop in front and back, the plaits ending in plain cord with gilt metal tags. The plaits and cords, front and back, are joined together by a short scarlet cloth strap in which is worked a button-hole. The aiguillette is attached to the shoulder of the tunic or frock coat by a button placed under the outer edge of the shoulder cord. The long cord is looped up on the short or front cord, the front cord and the short and long plaits are fastened together, and a small gold braid loop is fixed thereon to attach to the top button of the tunic or the lower hook of the collar of the frock coat. When the O.M., C.V.O., or any neck decoration is worn with the frock coat, the aiguillette will be fixed to the top button on the side on which it is worn. The arm is passed between the front plait and cord and the back or long plait and cord.

25. Officers holding the following appointments wear the aiguillette:-

Honorary Aide-de-Camp or Aide-de-Camp to the Governor-General.
Honorary Physician or Honorary Surgeon to the Governor General.
Aide-de-Camp to a Lieutenant-Governor, if a duly qualified officer of the Active Militia.
Chief of the General Staff.
Adjutant-General.
Quartermaster-General.
Master-General of the Ordnance.
Inspector-General.
Director-General or Director.
Judge Advocate General.
Military Secretary.
General Staff Officer, Grade 1.
Senior General Staff Officer of a Military District.
Senior Administrative Staff Officer of a Military District.
Brigade Major of a N.P.A.M. Brigade.
Staff Captain of a N.P.A.M. Brigade.
Military Attache.
Assistant Military Attache.
A.D.C. to General Officer.

The Aiguillette will also be worn by the Assistant Director of Organization, National Defence Headquarters, when detailed for duty as field officer in brigade waiting, or for such other duties as, in the opinion of the Adjutant-General, necessitate the wearing of the Aiguillette.

26. GORGET PATCHES.

General Officers, Brigadiers and Substantive Colonels will wear gorget patches as follows:-

(a) General Officers
Scarlet cloth, except as stated below:-
(i) Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps: Dull cherry cloth.
(ii) Royal Canadian Ordnance Corps: Blue cloth.
(iii) Royal Canadian Army Veterinary Corps: Maroon cloth.

In each case, the gorget patch will have a line of gold oak-leaf embroidery down the centre and a small gorget button.

(b) Brigadiers and Substantive Colonels-
Scarlet cloth, with a line of crimson silk gimp down the centre and small gorget button, except as stated bellows:-
(i) Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps: Dull cherry cloth.
(ii) Canadian Army Dental Corps: Emerald green cloth.
(iii) Royal Canadian Ordnance Corps: Blue cloth.
(iv) Royal Canadian Army Veterinary Corps: Maroon cloth.
(v) Royal Canadian Army Pay Corps: Primrose yellow cloth.
(vi) Chaplains with relative rank as substantive Colonel: Purple cloth.

In each case, the gorget patch will have a line of silk gimp of the colour of the cloth down the centre and a small gorget button.

Gorget patches are worn on the collar of the serge frock and the service dress and khaki drill jackets. With the serge frock, the gorget patches will be 4½ inches in length, pointed ar the outer edges, showing 3/16 inch blue serge above and below the patch. With the serge frock of the low step collar pattern, and the service dress and khaki drill jackets, the gorget patches will be 3½ inches long and 1¼ inches wide, triangular at the points and shaped to fit the collar above the step.

27. ARMLETS.

Armlets as detailed below, with distinctive marks for particular appointments, will be worn by the officers, indicated on the right arm above the elbow in service dress and on the greatcoat when that garment is worn:-

(a) National Defence Headquarters.
Half red and half dark blue laid horizontally with the red uppermost. The Royal Crest in metal with the following lettering in ¾ inch red letters below the Royal Crest:
G. - Chief of the General Staff’s Officers.
A. - Adjutant-General’s Officers.
Q. - Quartermaster-General Officers.
M.S. - Military Secretary.
(b) District Headquarters.
Red, black and red, with the following distinctions in ¾ inch scarlet letters, according to the appointment or employment of the officers concerned:-
A.D.C. - Aides-de-Camp
G. - General Staff.
ARMS. - District Weapon Training Officer.
A. & Q. - Officers, combining Adjutant-General’s and Quartermaster-General’s duties, e.g. A.A. & Q.M.G.
A. - Adjutant-General’s Staff.
Q. - Quartermaster-General Staff.
A gun in worsted embroidery - Royal Canadian Artillery.
E. - Royal Canadian Engineers.
S. - Signal Services.
S.T. - Supply and Transport Services.
M. - Medical Services.
O. - Ordnance Services.
V. - Veterinary Services.
P. - Pay Services.
D.C.O. - District Cadet Officers.
(c) Brigade Headquarters -
The following armlets will be worn by Brigade Headquarters Staffs of both the Permanent and Non-permanent Active Militia. A blue armlet with ¾ inch letters as under:-
B.M. - Brigade Major.
S.C. - Staff Captain.


PART IV.

ORDERS, DECORATIONS AND MEDALS.

28. METHOD OF WEARING.

(a) Full Dress.
(i) Decorations and medals, except those mentioned below, are worn on the left breast of the Full Dress garment, and under the pouch belt when this is worn. They are worn in a horizontal line, suspended from a single bar (which is not to be seen) or stitched to the garment, and are placed midway between the first and second buttons from the bottom of the collar, so as to show the Sovereign’s head.
(ii) The first earned clasp is worn nearest the medal. The uppermost clasp will be placed once inch below the top of the riband.
(iii) When decorations and medals cannot on account of their number, be suspended from the bar as to be fully seen, they are to overlap.
(iv) Medals awarded by the Royal Humane Society or by the Royal National Lifeboat Institution will, when authorized, be worn in position corresponding with war medals, but on the right breast.
(b) No. 9 Undress
The ribands are attached immediately above the left breast pocket.
(c) Mess Dress.
(i) Miniature badges of Orders and miniature decorations and medals are worn in Mess Dress on the left lapel of the jacket in one horizontal line, one inch below the point of the shoulder, suspended from a bar of which no part is to be seen.
(ii) The length of the bar must vary with the number of miniatures, but in no case should it project beyond either the lapel or shoulder seam of the jacket. When the miniatures cannot, on account of their number, be suspended from the bar so as to be fully seen, they are to overlap.
(iii) When medals are worn, collar badges will be placed ¾ inches below the bottom of the medals.
(iv) Miniature decorations will be of the same size as miniature medals.
(v) The ribands from which miniature badges, decorations and medals are suspended will be one inch in length, unless the possession of clasps necessitates them being longer. When two or more miniature badges, decorations and medals are worn, they will be so arranged that the lower edges (or lowest point of a star) are in line. The length of all ribands will be regulated by that of the miniature badge, decoration or medal, which, including clasps, is the longest.
(d) Service Dress.
Small ribands of Orders, except those of the Orders of the Garter, the Thistle, and St. Patrick, and the ribands of decorations and medals are worn in Service Dress on the left breast of the jacket in the prescribed order.
The ribands will be 3/8 inch in length and will sewn on to the Service Dress jacket or worn on a bar on the khaki drill jacket, without intervals, immediately above the left breast pocket of the jacket. When there is not sufficient room to wear the ribands in one row, they will be worn in two or more rows, at convenient intervals, not more than ½ inch apart.
No riband should be covered by the lapel of the Service jacket.
The ribands of Orders, worn with Service Dress, will be of the width of the ribands of companionship or membership which, in the majority of cases, is 1½ inches.
Broad ribands, badges and stars or Orders, and decorations and medals are not worn with the Service Dress or khaki drill jacket.
(e) Evening Dress.
The following are the occasions upon which Orders, miniature decorations and medals are to be worn with Evening Dress:-
(i) At all parties and dinners when the members of the Royal Family referred to below are present.
(The host should notify his guests if any of these members of the Royal Family will be present.)
(ii) At all parties and dinners when the Governor-General, the Administrator of the Government of the Dominion of Canada, when acting in the Governor-General’s absence, or the Lieutenant-Governor of the province within his province is present.
(The host should notify his guests if any of the abovementioned representatives of His Majesty will be present.)
(iii) At all parties and dinners given in the houses of Ambassadors and Ministers accredited to His Majesty’s Court, and in the houses of Ministers accredited to His Majesty’s Canadian Government, unless otherwise notified by the Ambassador or Minister concerned.
(A decoration of any country concerned should be worn in preference to a British and, if both are worn, the former should take precedence of the latter.)
(iv) At all official dinners and receptions, including Naval, Military and Air Force dinners, dinners of City Livery Companies and public dinners.
(The word “Decorations” on the invitation card to be the intimation from the host that the entertainment is an official one.)
(v) On official occasions when entertained by:-
The Prime Minister of Canada.
Members of the Cabinet of the Dominion of Canada.
The Speaker of the Senate.
The Speaker of the House of Commons.
The Prime Minister of a Province, within his province.
The Lord Lieutenant of a County, within his county.
The High Sheriff of a County, within his county.
British Cabinet Ministers and Ex-Cabinet Ministers.
Knights of the Order of the Garter.
Knights of the Order of the Thistle.
Knights of the Order of St. Patrick.
Great Officers of State and of the King’s Household.
Lord Mayors and Mayors.
Lord Provosts and Provosts.
(The word “Decorations” on the invitation card to be the intimation from the host that the entertainment is an official one.)

29. LENGTH OF RIBANDS.

When medals and decorations are worn on the breast the riband will be 1 inch in length, unless the possession of clasps necessitates it being longer. When two or more medals and decorations are worn, they will be so arranged that the lower edges (or the lowest point of a star) are in line. The lengths of all ribands will be regulated by that of the decoration or medal which, including the clasp, is the longest. These instructions will apply equally to miniature medals and decorations. When ribands are worn without medals or decorations, they will be 3/8 inch in length.

30. ORDER IN WHICH MEDALS GRANTED DURING THE GREAT WAR WILL BE WORN.

Medals awarded for services during the Great War (1914-1919) should be worn in the following order:-

1914 Star.
1914-1915 Star.
British War Medal.
Mercantile Marine War Medal.
Victory Medal.
Territorial Force War Medal.
India General Service Medal.
(For operations in Afghanistan, 1919).

31. EMBLEMS WORN ON RIBANDS WITH “UNDRESS: AND “SERVICE DRESS” TO DENOTE THE POSSESSION OF A BAR RO CERTAIN DECORATIONS AND MEDALS.

The following emblems are worn the ribands of certain decorations and medals, when worn on the “Undress” and “Service Dress” garments, to denote that the wearer has been awarded a bar or bars to the original decoration or medal for subsequent acts of bravery or for further distinguished conduct in the field:-

Victoria Cross -      A miniature replica of the Victoria Cross. The award of a bar to the original decoration will be marked by the addition of a second miniature Cross on a riband, an additional Cross being added for each bar awarded.
Distinguished Service Order
Military Cross
Distinguished Conduct Medal
Military Medal
Medal for Meritorious Service
Efficiency Medal
     )
)  A small silver rose; one
)  or more according to the
)  number of bars awarded.
)
)

A small silver rose is worn on the riband of the 1914 Star to distinguish it from the 1914-1915 Star.

These emblems do not form part of the decoration or medal, and are not to be worn on the riband when the decoration or medal is worn in original on the Full Dress tunic, or in miniature on the Mess jacket or Evening Dress coat.

32. WEARING OF EMBLEM TO DENOTE THE WEARER HAS BEEN MENTIONED IN DESPATCHES.

The emblem, consisting of an oak-leaf in bronze, is in two sizes and is worn on the Victory Medal riband. The larger size is attached to the riband when the medal is worn. It will be affixed to the centre of the riband, pointing upwards towards the left shoulder, at an angle of 60 degrees from the inside edge of the riband, stem to the right. The small size will be attached to the small riband when the medal is not worn, transversely across the riband, stem to the right.

Additional emblems will not be worn in respect of second or subsequent mention in despatches.

33. STATE, OFFICIAL, AND PUBLIC OCCASIONS.

(a) The following occasions will be considered State ceremonies:-
(i) When the Sovereign or the representative of the Sovereign is present.
(ii) The parade in celebration of the birthday of the Sovereign.
(iii) When specially ordered on the occasion of a parade or ceremony, at which a member of the Royal Family is present.
(b) A function or entertainment given or arranged by any Government Department, or Government Institution will be regarded as an official occasion.
(c) A public occasion is one the invitation to which is used by name of any municipal corporation, institution, society or livery company.

34. KING GEORGE V SILVER JUBILEE MEDAL.

The order in which this medal is worn in relation to other Orders, Decorations and Medals, is as follows:-

(a) It is worn to the left of the following:-
(i) The Victoria Cross.
(ii) The Insignia of any of the classes of British Orders of Knighthood.
(iii) Decorations, i.e. Royal Red Cross, Distinguished Service Cross, Military Cross, etc.
(iv) Order of St. John and Albert Medal.
(v) Medals for Gallantry and Distinguished Conduct.
(vi) War Medal.
(vii) Any other Jubilee, Coronation or Durbar Medal.
(b) It is worn to the right of all the following:
(i) Efficiency, Meritorious or Long Service Medals.
(ii) Medals belonging to Orders, i.e., Royal Victorian Medal, Imperial Service Medal, medal of the Order of the British Empire (except for Gallantry) Service Medal of the Order of St. John.
(iii) Foreign Orders, Decorations or Medals.


PART V.

SUBSTANTIVE COLONELS – OFFICERS OF THE RESERVE AND RETIRED LIST.

35. SUBSTANTIVE COLONEL – R.C. SIGNALS.

An officer who is promoted to the rank of substantive Colonel and remains on the cadre of the Corps, will wear Corps uniform and badges, with the following additions and exceptions:-

(a) On the serge frock, the service dress jacket and khaki drill jacket, gorget patches, as described in para. 26 (b).
(b) The shoulder straps of the mess jacket will be edges with ½ inch staff pattern gold lace, with rank badges in silvery embroidery.
(c) One row of gold oak-leaf embroidery on the peak of the forge cap.
(d) With Service Dress, when on active service, or at annual training and manoeuvers, a khaki service dress cap of a similar pattern to the service dress cap worn by officers below the rank of Colonel, but with gilt instead of bronze buttons and with a coloured band as worn on the forge cap; with Service Dress on all other occasions, the forage cap with khaki cover. The distinctive band and the peak[16]

36. OFFICERS OF THE RESERVE AND RETIRED LIST.

(a) An officer of the Reserve of Officers may wear the uniform of the regiment or corps in which he last served. When re-employed on Militia service he will provide himself with service dress. He is not required to provide himself with uniform until called up for service.
(b) An officer placed on the Retired List, with permission to retain his rank, may wear the uniform of the regiment or corps in which he last served, with the addition of the letter “R” on the shoulder straps or shoulder cords below the badges of rank.
(c) General Officers on the Retired List, including those holding honorary rank, will wear the uniform of their rank with the letter “R” on the shoulder cords or straps, below and on the material as the badges of ranks. If Colonels-Commandant, Honorary Colonels, or Honorary Lieutenant-Colonels of regiments or corps, they may alternatively wear regimental uniform with should cords or straps and badges of rank as for Colonel or Lieutenant-Colonel, without the letter “R”.
A General Officer retired from a Corps will wear the uniform prescribed for him while on the active list, with the letter “R” as above.
(d) An officer of the Reserve of Officers or Retired List, of or below the substantive rank of Colonel who, prior to retirement or transfer to the Reserve of Officers, did not belong to a regiment or corps, will wear the uniform of his rank as prescribed in paras. 197 to 236 of Dress Regulations for Officers of the Canadian Militia, 1932, and in the case of an officer on the Retired List, the letter “R” on the shoulder cords or straps below the rank badges.
(e) A retired officer, if re-employed on Militia service, will be required to provide himself only with service dress.
(f) A Staff Officer transferred to the Reserve of Officers, or the Retired List, will not wear the aiguillette or armlet, unless he holds an appointment as A.D.C. or Hon. A.D.C., when he will wear the aiguillette authorized for such appointment.
(g) The letter “R” will be in silver embroidery on the shoulder cords, in gilt or gilding metal on cloth shoulder straps, and in bronze in the case of an officer retired from a rifle regiment.


PART VI.

FULL DRESS.

37. HEAD DRESS.

Busby; black lynx, or other suitable fur, 6¾ inches high in front and 7¾ inches at the back. A black cloth bag covering the top and falling down the right side to the bottom. A gilt socket ornamented with the Corps Crest in gilt (figure Mercury in silver), on the left side. Black leather chin strap, with black enamelled buckle. Scarlet plume.

38. TUNIC.

Scarlet cloth, lined drab, with collar and cuffs of black cloth, the skirts cut square in front, lined white, and open at the back. The front and back skirts edged with black cloth. The cuffs pointed, and Austrian knot of gold orris cord, traced all round with gold Russian braid, 9¾ inches deep from bottom of cuff; the cuff 4¼ inches at the point, 2¾ inches at the back. Eight large buttons down the front, two at the waist behind; twisted round gold shoulder cords, lined scarlet, small regimental button at the top[17]. A row of 3/4 inch gold staff lace round the top of the collar, showing an edging of black cloth. Gold Russian braid on the collar seam.[18]

39. COLLAR BADGES.

See para. 9 (c).

40. BUTTONS.

Large:
In gilt. A plain button with the figure of Mercury and a portion of the globe, superimposed thereon.
Small:
In gilt, of same design as the large button.

41. OVERALLS.

Blue cloth with scarlet stripe 2 inches wide down each outside seam. Overalls should be close fitting and made to conform with the shape of the leg and should be strapped down firmly to the boot and fit closely above the spur. (Cloth – Hawkes & Co. Pattern 26 (b).

42. BOOTS.

Wellington Boots.

43. SPURS.

Box spurs with plain rowels.

44. SWORD.

Infantry pattern.

45. SCABBARD.

Steel, nickel-plated.

46. SWORD BELT.

Blue web 1¾ inches wide, strengthened at various parts with black morocco leather, and the furniture of gilding metal. The sword belt is worn under the tunic.

47. SWORD SLINGS.

Black Russian[19] leather, 1 inch wide, with two rows of ¼ inch gold staff lace. Round billets, plain wire buckle.

Girdle:
Black Russian[20] leather, 2 1½ inches wide, two rows of ½ inch gold staff lace. #4/38

48. WAIST PLATE

Plain gilt, with Corps Crest in centre.

49. SHOULDER BELT.

Black Russian leather, 2 inches wide, two rows 5/8 inch gold staff lace, The shoulder belt is worn over the left shoulder.

50. POUCH.

Black patent leather, collapsible, with the Royal Cypher and Crown badge in gilt.

51. GLOVES.

White doeskin or buckskin.

52. SWORD KNOT.

Gold and black[21] orris with acorn and runner.


PART VII

UNDRESS.

53. CAP, FORAGE.

Universal blue cloth, with three[22] cloth welts, 4-1/4 inches total depth, diameter across the top 10-3/8 inches for a cap fitting 21 3/4 inches in circumference, the top to be 1/8 inch larger or smaller in diameter for every 1/4 inch the cap may vary in size of head above or below the above mentioned standard. The sides to be made in four pieces, and to be 2-1/8 inches deep between the welts[23], a cloth band 1-1/2 inches wide placed between the two lower welts. The cap to be set up on a band of stiff leather, or other suitable material, 1-3/4 inches deep, but not stiffened up in front. Chin strap of black patent leather 3/8 inch wide, buttoned on to two 1/2 inch gilt buttons placed immediately behind the corners of the peak. The peak to droop at an angle of 45 degrees, and to be 2 inches deep in the middle when worn with embroidery, and 1-3/4 inches when plain. Cap badge as described in para. 9 (b) (i).

Peaks to be embroidered as follows:-
General Officers - Two rows of gold oak-leaf embroidery on lower edge.
Brigadiers and substantive Colonels - One row of gold oak-leaf embroidery on lower edge.
Field Officers below the rank of substantive Colonels. - Plain gold embroidery ¾ inch wide on lower edge.
Other Officers - -Plain peak.

54. FROCK, SERGE.

Blue serge, full in chest, cut with broad back. Slits at side, length of skirt to vary in proportion to height of officer (for officers 5 feet 9 inches the skirt will be 10 inches), five small buttons down the front. Two breast pockets outside, 6-3/4 inches wide, 8 inches deep, the top edge of the pocket in line with the second button, three-pointed flap, small button and hole, loose pleat on the read side of the pocket, two similar outside patch pockets, below, with a three-pointed flap. Two inside breast pockets up and down with a hole and button, two inside skirt pockets with hole and button. Black alpaca lining. Should straps of the same material as the frock, fastened with a small button. Stand-up collar from 1-1/4 to 1-3/4 inches high, cut square at the top in front and fastened with two hocks and eyes, with black silk tape sewn on inside. White linen strip collar, showing no more than 1/8 inch above the uniform. Sleeves with pointed cuffs 6 inches high, with 2-1/4 inch slit, two small buttons and button holes. Badges of rank in metal. Collar dogs as for full dress.

NOTES:
(a) With the serge frock of the open step collar pattern, white linen wing collars and a black corded silk tie fastened in a sailor’s knot will be worn.
(b) The serge frock will not be worn when parading with troops.
(c) The serge frock is optional for officers of the Royal Canadian Signals (N.P.).[24]

55. OVERALLS.

As for Full Dress.

56. BOOTS.

As for Full Dress.

57. GLOVES.

As for Service Dress.

58. BELT.

"Sam Browne" with frog and one brace.As for Full Dress.

NOTE:
The “Sam Browne” belt is not worn without the sword.


PART VIII.

MESS DRESS.

59. MESS JACKET.

Scarlet cloth, with black cloth roll collar and black pointed cuffs; cuffs six inches deep at the points and 2¾ inches behind, a one-inch slit at the back seam; shoulder strap of scarlet cloth 1½ inches wide at the base tapering to about one inch at the point. The shoulder straps are sewn in at the shoulder; rounded points fastened with a small button. Buttons for mess jacket to be small gilt with the figure of Mercury in silver. Badges of rank in metal. No button on the front of the jacket and no gold braid or piping. (Cloth – Hawkes & Co., Pattern No.4 – Facings No.38).

60. MESS VEST.

Black cloth, open in front, no collar, fastened with four small gilt buttons with the figure of Mercury in silver.

61. OVERALLS.

As in Full Dress. The overalls will be cut sufficiently high at the waist so that there will be ample overlap by the Mess Vest.

62. BOOTS.

Wellington.

63. SPURS.

Box spurs with plain rowels.

64. COLLAR.

White linen square winged collar.

65. TIE.

Black bow tie with square ends. The width of the ends should be approximately two inches and the length of the tie, in inches, should be twice the size of the collar.

66. SHIRT.

White linen with stiff bosom and cuffs, 2 gold studs showing.

67. GLOVES.

White kid.


PART IX.

SERVICE DRESS.

68. CAP SERVICE DRESS.

(a) Stiff Pattern, .of the same shape as the forage cap, but of drab felt material to match the service dress, brown leather chin-strap, two bronze buttons. (The Floexolite Cap – Hawkes & Co.)
(b) Soft Pattern: of the same shape and colour as the stiff pattern, but with a flexible peak, and not wired around the top of the cap. The soft pattern cap is carried or worn on active service, at training and on manoeuvres.

69. JACKET SERVICE DRESS.

Drab material of the same shade as the sealed pattern samples; single breasted, but as a lounge coat to the waist, with back seam, loose at the chest and shoulders, but fitted at the waist; military skirts to bottom edge; length of skirt 13 inches, for a man 5 feet 9 inches, varying in proportion to height, step collar, depth of opening about 3 inches, two cross-patch breast pockets above, 6½ inches wide and 7 1/2 inches deep to the top of the flap, box plait in centre, 2 1/4 inches wide, three-pointed flap 6 1/2 inches wide and 2 1/4 inches deep, fastened with a small button, two expanding pockets below the waist at the sides, 9¼ inches wide at the top and 10 1/2 inches at the bottom, 8 inches deep to the top of the pocket and fastened at the top with a small button, flap with button-hole to cover pockets 3 1/2 inches deep, 10 1/2 inches wide. The top of the pockets should be sewn down at the corners in such a manner that on service the pocket can be expanded at the top also; inside watch pocket with leather tab above for chain or strap. Four large regimental buttons down the front. To be lined or not as required with lining of similar colour to the jacket. Pointed cuffs 2 1/2 inches wide rising to 6 inches at the point. Badges of rank in metal on the shoulder straps. Shoulder straps of same material as the jacket, fastened with a small regimental button. Jackets to be made of either heavy or light whipcord. (Hawkes & Co. No205B or No.191).

70. BREECHES, MOUNTED PATTERN.

Drab coloured Cavalry Twill with drab coloured buckskin strappings; a small horn button about 2½ inches from the bottom of each leg at the back for field boots to be attached, to reach about 6 inches below the knee, fairly loose over the hip and thigh with a good fullness at top half over the knee. Openings at bottom of legs about 5 inches long with eyelet-holes for laces on either side, the top and bottom eyelet-holes being about ½ inch from top and bottom of opening, the other holes being equidistant, fly front, two cross pockets, buckle and strap at the back. (Cloth – Hawkes & Co., Cavalry Twill Pattern No.326).

71. TROUSERS.

Trousers are of the same pattern as issued to other ranks, but fitted with cuffs.

Trousers are fitted with a waist strap and buckle and the pockets are cut across.

Service Dress trousers and shoes will not be worn on parade or duty except at stables and on fatigue duties in barracks, or when officers are employed in offices. (Cloth as for Service Jacket).

72. BOOTS.

Brown field: the boots are laced at the instep with seven pairs of eyelet-holes; plain toe-caps with two rows of stitching 1/16 inch apart, bellows tongue coming to within about 2 inches of the top of the boot and curved downwards and inwards the centre so as to obviate any pressure of the tongue on the shin bone; top lined to a depth of about 4 3/4 inches; fastened with three buckles and straps spaced equidistantly up the leg, proportionate with the length of the boot; brass buckles ½ inch wide; horizontal counter about 3 1/4 inches above the top of the heel; the front flap is stiffened with whalebone and these is a back strap about 5/8 inch wide. Spur rests are optional and a detachable garter (1/2 inch wide) at the top of the boot is also optional

Officers now in possession of brown ankle boots and brown leather leggings may continue them in wear until replacement becomes necessary.

73. SPURS.

As described in para. 14.

74. BELTS "SAM BROWNE".

As described in para. 12.

75. SHIRT.

Drab material to match the colour of the Service Jacket. (Cloth – Hawkes & Co. No.029c).

76. COLLAR.

Drab material as for shirts, War Office pattern. (See Appendix I.) (Cloth – Hawkes & Co. No.029c).

77. TIE.

Similar material as for shirts and collars.

78. GLOVES.

Brown leather, dogskin (sic) or buckskin with one button.

79. SHOES.

Brown leather with plain toe-cap.

80. SOCKS.

Drab colour to match the service trousers.

81. WHISTLE AND LANYARD.

As described in para. 22..

82. WATER BOTTLE.

The bottle is made of pure aluminum, kidney shaped. Dimensions 5 1/4 inches long, 7 1/4 inches wide, 3 inches deep. The bottle has a cork stopper attached by a short chain. The cork is held on a stem, tapped on the end to receive a small nut, so that the cork may be readily renewed with necessary.

The bottle is covered with felt, and has a strap fixed round it, passing through four loops sewn on to the felt. The extremities of this strap, which are at the shoulders of the bottle, are provided with brass loops, through which the ends of the sling or carrier are passed. The leather sling is 5/8 inch wide, and of suitable length for the wearer. It has a brass stud fixed near each end and a hole at the end to button on to the stud. The sling may therefore be worn under belts, so as to carry the bottle steadily, and so that the bottle may be removed without disturbing the sling. The leather is all brown “best bridle”. Weight complete about 14 ounces. Capacity of bottle, 2 1/4 pints.

83. HAVERSACK.

The Haversack to be made of drab waterproof material with leather bottom and provided with straps and brass swivels suitable for attachment to the “Sam Browne” belt. The flap will be provided with two leather straps, fitting to brass buckles on the on the haversack. An adjustable shoulder sling will be provided with suitable brass swivels for use then the haversack is worn without the “Sam Browne” belt.

84. FIELD-GLASSES.

There is no sealed pattern, but prism binoculars are recommended. The carrying case should be leather of a colour to match that of the "Sam Browne" belt; and will be provided with a loop through which the "Sam Browne" belt can be passed. An adjustable leather shoulder sling should be provided.

85. GREATCOAT.

Universal pattern. Cloth, drab mixture, milled and waterproofed; double breasted, to reach within a foot of the ground. Stand and fall collar 5 inches deep (2-inch stand and 3-inch fall), fastening with two hooks and eyes; cloth tab and buttons, a 2½ inch inverted expanding pleat down the centre of the back, from the collar to the waist; terminating under the back strap; ordinary sleeves, loose turn-back cuffs of single material, 6 inches deep, two large cross pockets with square flaps at the waist; vertical slit for sword jetted in the left side 1½ inches above the pocket; a pocket in the left inside breast placed vertically between the second and third buttons, two rows of buttons down the front, four in each row from 5½ to 6½ inches apart in accordance with the officer’s height, the rows 8 to 10 inches apart at the top and 4 to 6 inches apart at the bottom as most suitable to the officer’s waist and chest measurements, two buttons to back slit with holes in the fly; a 2½ inch cloth back strap sewn in side seams and fastened with three holes and buttons, coat lined with drab flannel on the shoulder and sleeves only or to the waist as preferred; shoulder straps of the same material as the garment, sewn to the shoulder at the base and fastened at the top by a small button, the top of the strap to be triangular; buttons and badges of rank in gilt metal.

The coat is cut below the waist with sufficient spring to form an 8 inch lap when buttoned. The slit at the back should be of suitable length for riding, and a small saddle flap may be provided.[25]


PART X.

SUMMER DRESS.

86. HELMET.

"Wolseley" pattern, cork, made with six seams, khaki drill covered, projecting brim all round, 3 inches in front, 4 inches at back, 2 inches at sides; ventilated at the top with a zinc button covered with khaki drill; side hooks; #4/38 at the top of the helmet, a collet riveted on to a collar 3/8 inch wide to receive the button. Brown leather, chin strap 3/8 inch wide. Plain khaki puggaree with nine folds. No badges, plumes, buckles or ornaments of any description are worn with the khaki helmet.[26]

The "patch" or "flash" consisting of Corps ribbon 2 inches wide is worn vertically on the left side light blue stripe to the front, the ends of the ribbon to be tucked under the lower end of the puggaree and into the fourth fold from the top.

87. JACKETS – KHAKI DRILL.

Pattern as described for jacket, Service Dress. Holes, suitably button-holed, will be provided for buttons, badges of rank, and shoulder titles. Four large buttons in front. (Cloth – Hawkes & Co. Heavy No. 87D or Light No. 185).

88. BREECHED – KHAKI DRILL.

Patter as described for breeches, service dress, with the following exceptions. Strappings of same material. Three belt loops, one behind and one at each hip, 4 inches long and 5/8 inch wide to take “Sam Browne” belt. Belt loops to be sewn to the breeches on top and secured on bottom with small brown bone button. Top of the breeches to be cut for wearing belt, and provided with inside buttons for braces. (Cloth – Hawkes & Co. No.88A.)

Note:
Field boots or brown ankle boots and puttees, as may be ordered, will be worn with breeches – khaki drill. (See also para.96 b)

89. SHORTS – KHAKI DRILL.

Cut as trousers to reach the top of the knee-cap. To fit snugly to the waist and over the hips, but loosely in the thighs and legs. A waist band 3¼ inches wide, forming part of the garment, to terminate in front with two straps and buckles of white metal. The buckles to be secured each with one small brown button, in order that the buckles may be removed when the garment is washed. Fly front, pockets cut across, no hip pockets, three belt loops, one behind and one at each hip, 4 inches long and 5/8 inch wide, to be sewn to the garment on top and secured on the bottom with a small brown bone button. No buttons for braces. (Cloth as for Jackets – Khaki Drill).

90. TROUSERS – KHAKI DRILL.

Cut as for trousers, service dress, with the following exceptions; a small strap and buckle are provided at each hip to ensure the garment fits the waist snugly, also three belt loops, one behind and one at each hip, 4 inches long and 5/8 inch wide, to be sewn to the garment on top and secured on the bottom with a small brown bone button. The top pf the trousers will be cut for wearing a belt. (Cloth as for Jackets – Khaki Drill).

91. SHIRT, SUMMER.

As for service dress, except that shoulder straps will be provided. These will be sewn in at the shoulder and have rounded points fastened with a small shirt brown bone button. Badges of rank in worsted. (Cloth – Hawkes & Co. No.077 B.).

92. COLLAR.

Similar in design as those laid down for service dress, but of same material as for shirts, summer.

93. TIE.

Same material as shirts, summer.

94. BOOTS.

(a) Field- As for service dress.
(b) Ankle- Brown with plain toe-caps.

95. PUTTEES.

Woolen to match the colour of the Khaki Drill. To be worn rolled down and fastened at the bottom over the ankle boot. (Fox pattern – Foreign service shade).

96. STOCKINGS.

Woolen to match the colour of Khaki drill. Stockings will reach to just below the knees and will be folded down 4 inches at the tob [(sic)]. Stockings will be worn with shorts at all times except:-

(a) When parading with troops.
(b) When on ceremonial parades, when breeches are worn.

97. SHOES.

As for service dress.


PART XI.

FURS.

98. CAPS, WINTER, “YUKON” PATTERN.

(a) Material    -   The material to be used in the crown is to be light weight, Melton drab cloth, of a shade to match the greatcoat, the weight of which is to be approximately 12 ounces per yard, 56 inches wide.
(b) Trimmings    -   The fur is to be Plucked Beaver, natural in colour, except in the case of the Royal Canadian Regiment, who wear unplucked Otter.
(c) Fur    -   The fur is to be Plucked Beaver, natural in colour, except in the case of the Royal Canadian Regiment, who wear unplucked Otter.
(d) Tie Ribbons.    -   The Tie Ribbon are to be first quality Brown Corded Silk, 5/8 inch wide, the finished length of each ribbon to be 10 inches.
(e) Dimensions:
Size Number Inches Depth
Of
Crown
Length
Of
Fur
Band.
Extreme
Depth
of Fur Band
at
side
Extreme
Depth
of Fur
Band
At
back.
Extreme
Depth
Of
Peak.
Width
Of
Peak
At
Bottom.
6-1/2 20-7/8 7 16-1/2
-
-
-
-
6-5/8 21-1/8 7-1/4 16-7/8
-
-
-
-
6-3/4 21-3/8 7-1/2 17-1/4
-
-
-
-
6-7/8 21-7/8 7-3/4 17-3/8 5-1/2 3-1/2 4-1/2 6
7 22-3/8 8 18
-
-
-
-
7-1/8 22-7/8 8-1/4 18-3/8
-
-
-
-
7-1/4 23-3/8 8-1/2 18-3/4
-
-
-
-
7-3/8 23-5/8 8-3/4 19-1/8
-
-
-
-
7-1/2 23-7/8 9 19-1/2


99. GAUNTLETS, OFFICERS’ PATTERN.

MATERIAL.- Fur - Plucked Beaver, natural in colour. The palm to be made from Calfskin, brown, suede finish. The hand, back and front, to be lined with natural furred lambskin and the cuff with a light pliable calfskin. For size 8, the length overall is 14¼ inches. The cuff, which will be 10 inches wide at the top, will be cut so as to allow sufficient room for sleeve of the greatcoat, to prevent the cuff of the gauntlet from being pushed down over the hand.


PART XII.

MISCELLANEOUS.

100. CORPS CREST.

An oval inscribed "Royal Canadian Corps of Signals" and surmounted by a crown, with the figure of Mercury inset, standing on a globe. Partly encircling the oval, two sprays of maple leaves with stems cross at the bottom, and fastened by a ribbon, the whole resting on a scroll inscribed:

"Velox— Versutus— Vigilans".

101. CORPS COLOURS.

The Corps Colours are light blue (top), dark blue (centre) and dark green (bottom) in the ration of 3 light blue or green to 1 dark blue.

Where the Corps Colours are arranged horizontally the light blue will be the uppermost; where the colours are arranged vertically, the light blue will be on the observer’s left.

102. CORPS TIE.

Sealed pattern which can be obtained only by Officers of the Corps, from The Canadian Signal Training Centre.[27]

---oOo---

Amendment No. 1

Dated 20th October, 1936.


APPENDIX I.

Diagrams showing the position of badges.

Dress Regulations Officers RCSigs 1936-1939 Figure 1.jpg

Dress Regulations Officers RCSigs 1936-1939 Figure 2.jpg

Dress Regulations Officers RCSigs 1936-1939 Figure 3.jpg

Dress Regulations Officers RCSigs 1936-1939 Figure 4.jpg

Dress Regulations Officers RCSigs 1936-1939 Figure 5.jpg

Dress Regulations Officers RCSigs 1936-1939 Figure 6.jpg


INDEX

Para.
Aiguillette-
    General instructions . . . 24
    Wearing of by staff officers . . . 25, 36 (f)
Armlets . . . 27
Armlets, signal service . . . 16
Badges-
    Cap . . . 9 (b), App. I
    Collar . . . 9 (c), App. I
    Metal for . . . 8
    Of rank . . . 9 (a)
    Shoulder titles . . . 9 (d)
    Substantive colonels, R.C. Signals . . . 35
    Wearing of unauthorized. . . . . . 1
    Worsted for shirts, summer . . . 91
Balls, fancy dress, wearing of uniform at . . . 5
Belts –
    Sam Browne . . . 12
    Sam Browne not worn in undress without sword . . . 58
    Sword, in full dress . . . 46
    Shoulder, in full dress . . . 49
Blazer . . . 11
Boots –
    Brown ankle, may be worn until replacement necessary . . . 72
    Field . . . 72
    With full dress . . . 42
    With mess dress . . . 62
    With service dress . . . 72
    With summer dress . . . 72, 88, 94
Breeches –
    Khaki drillazer . . . 88
    Mounted pattern . . . 70
British Warm Coat . . . 19
Busby, full dress head-dress. . . . 37
Buttons-
    Blazer . . . 11
    Full dress . . . 38, 40
    General description . . . 10
    Mess dress . . . 59
    Service dress . . . 68, 69
    Summer dress . . . 87
    Undress . . . 54
Cap -
    Badges . . . 9 (b), App. I
    Colonel, R.C. Signals . . . 35 (d)
    Full dress . . . 37
    Forage . . . 53, App. I
    Service dress . . . 68, App. I
    Winter “Yukon” pattern . . . 98, App. I
Canes - . . . 13
Capes . . . 20
Clothing, sealed patterns where deposited . . . 2
Coats
    British warm . . . 19
    Great, universal pattern . . . 85
    Waterproof . . . 21
Collars
    Badges . . . 9 (c), App. I
    Mess dress . . . 64
    Service dress . . . 76, App. I
    Summer dress . . . 92, App. I
    Undress . . . 54
Colonel, substantive . . . 35
Corps, colours . . . 101
Corps crest . . . 100
Corps Tie . . . 102
Crepe band . . . 15
Decorations -
    Emblems in head dress . . . 4
    Emblems to denote possession of bars . . . 31
    Emblems to denote mentions in despatches . . . 32
    Method of wearing . . . 28
    Miniatures . . . 28 (c)
    Ribands, length of . . . 29
    State official and public occasions . . . 33
Dress, orders of -
    Full dress, general . . . 37-53
     “ “ mounted . . . 23 (1)
     “ “ dismounted . . . 23 (2)
     “ “ levees and courts . . . 23 (3)
    Mess order . . . 23 (6), 59-67
    Officers of reserve and retired list . . . 36
    Service dress . . . 68-85
     “ “ marching order . . . 23 (4)
     “ “ drill order . . . 23 (5)
    Substantive colonels . . . 35
    Summer dress . . . 86-97
    Undress . . . 23 (7), (8), (9), 54-58
Emblems-
    wearing of on special days . . . 4
     “ “ “ medal ribbands . . . 31, 32
Field glasses . . . 84
Flash, helmet . . . 86
Foreign countries-
    wearing of uniform in . . . 7
     “ “ “ at manoeuvres . . . 7
Frock, serge . . . 54
Full dress . . . 23, 37-53
Gauntlets, winter pattern . . . 99
General instructions . . . 1-22
Gilding metal for badges, ornaments, etc. . . . 8
Girdle, full dress . . . 47
Gloves-
    with full dress . . . 51
    with frock, serge . . . 57
    with mess dress . . . 67
    with service dress . . . 78
    with undress . . . 57
Gorget patches . . . 26
Gorget patches, substantive colonels – R.C. Signals . . . 35
Great coat . . . 85
Haversack . . . 83
Helmet . . . 86
Jackets-
    Khaki drill . . . 87
    service dress . . . 69
Lanyards . . . 22
Leggings . . . 72
Medals-
    Emblems denoting bars . . . 31
    Emblems denoting mentions in despatches . . . 32
    King George V Jubilee Medal . . . 34
    Length of ribands . . . 29
    Method of wearing . . . 28
    Order in which Great War medals will be worn . . . 30
Mess dress . . . 23 (6), 59-67
Metal, gilding for ornaments and badges, etc. . . . 8
Mourning and military funerals . . . 15
Orders (see decorations)
Overalls-
    full dress . . . 41
    mess dress . . . 61
    undress . . . 55
Patterns -
    Sealed, deviations from forbidden . . . 1
     “ where deposited . . . 2
Peaks of caps, embroidery of . . . 53
Plain clothes, wearing of . . . 6
Plume, head dress full dress . . . 37
Pouch, full dress . . . 50
Puttees . . . 95
Rank, badges of . . . 9 (a)
Reserve of officers . . . 36
Retired list . . . 36
Ribands . . . 29
“Sam Browne” belt . . . 12
Scabbards . . . 17
Service dress-
    drill order . . . 23 (5)
    general description of . . . 68-85
    marching order . . . 23 (4)
    wearing of medals and decorations, etc. . . . 28 (d)
Shirts for wear with service dress . . . 75
Shirts for wear with summer dress . . . 91
Shirts for wear with mess dress . . . 66
Shoes, when worn . . . 71
Shoes, description . . . 79
Shorts, khaki drill . . . 89
Shoulder straps, mess jacket, colonels . . . 35 (b)
Shoulder belt, full dress . . . 49
Shoulder straps, officers of reserve and retired list . . . 36
Socks . . . 80
Stockings . . . 96
Summer dress . . . 86-97
Spurs-
    full dress . . . 14, 43
    mess dress . . . 14, 63
    service dress . . . 14, 73
    undress . . . 14
Sword and scabbard . . . 17
Sword knots . . . 18, 52
Sword belt, full dress . . . 46
Sword slings, full dress . . . 47
Ties-
    Corps pattern . . . 102
    khaki drill . . . 93
    mess dress . . . 65
    serge frock open step collar . . . 54
    service dress . . . 77
Trousers-
    khaki drill . . . 90
    service dress . . . 71
Tunic, full dress . . . 38
Undress . . . 23 (7, 8, 9), 54-58
Uniform-
    at public parades and foreign manoeuvres. . . . 7
    not to be worn in foreign countries . . . 7
    officers of reserve and retired list . . . 36
    officer to ensure they obtain authorized patterns . . . 2
    substantive colonels, R.C. Signals . . . 35
    Watch chains not to be visible when worn . . . 3
    When on duty . . . 6
Waterbottle . . . 82
Waterproof coat . . . 21
Web sword belt . . . 46
Whistles . . . 22


Amendments

  1. Amendment 1 20-12-36 inserted after fixed: so that the top of the crown is
  2. Amendment 4 17-09-38 labelled existing text as sub-paragraph (a) and inserted:
    (b) Except as provided in sub paras. (c) and (d) below, spurs will be worn with full dress and service dress. They will also be worn with mess dress, undress, at levees and courts when Wellington boots are worn, and when paying official visits to naval ships.
    (c)Spurs will not be worn when travelling on board ship, when inspecting armaments or magazines, when on duties involving flying or in connection with motor vehicles, or when the wearing of spurs would be inadvisable from the point of view of safety.
    (d) Spurs will not be worn in winter dress, except on mounted duties. The D.O.C., or other senior officer concerned, may also authorize all ranks to despense with the wearing of spurs on mounted duties whenever the severity of the weather justifies such action.
  3. Amendment 4 17-09-38 replaced the word celebrations with ceremonies
  4. Amendment 4 17-09-38 inserted after officers: in private mourning
  5. Amendment 2 26-11-36 inserted after worn: with the white portion uppermost
  6. Amendment 2 26-11-36 inserted at the end of the paragraph: (Cloth – Hawkes & Co, Pattern No 142)
  7. Amendment 2 26-11-36 replaced the word infantry with cavalry
  8. Amendment 1 20-10-36 replaced the word left with right
  9. Amendment 1 20-10-36 replaced the word left with right
  10. Amendment 4 17-09-38 replaced Pantaloons with Overalls
  11. Amendment 4 17-09-38 replaced Butcher boots with Wellington Boots
  12. Amendment 4 17-09-38 removed sub-paragraph (4) in its entirety
  13. Amendment 4 17-09-38 deleted the phrase When mounted - Pantaloons and butcher boots. When dismounted -
  14. Amendment 1 20-12-36 deleted this sentance
  15. Amendment 4 17-09-38 inserted at the end of the paragraph: , except when the serge frock is worn in place of full dress.
  16. Amendment 4 17-09-38 inserted after peak: and
  17. Amendment 4 17-09-38 inserted after top: and ends
  18. Amendment 2 26-11-36 inserted at end of paragraph: (Cloth – Tunic, Hawkes & Co., Pattern No. 4, - Collars and Cuffs, Pattern No. 38)
  19. Amendment 4 17-09-38 replaced Russian with Russia
  20. Amendment 4 17-09-38 replaced Russian with Russia
  21. Amendment 4 17-09-38 removed and black
  22. Unknown amendment inserted after three: blue
  23. Unknown amendment inserted after welts: a black oak leaf
  24. Amendment 2 26-11-36 inserted at the end of the sub-paragraph: (Cloth – Hawkes & Co., Pattern No. 118)
  25. Amendment 2 26-11-36 inserted at the end of the paragraph: (Cloth – Hawkes & Co., Pattern No.153A)
  26. This paragraph is marked as Amendment 4 in it's entirety. Not known what the original text was.
  27. Unknown amendment deleted the entire paragraph
Source document Credit: Military Communications and Electronics Museum Archives